Jahaziel Molina-Del-Rio, Neuropsychology Laboratory, Centro Universitario Los Valles, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico Rosa M. Hidalgo-Aguirre, Neuropsychology Laboratory, Centro Universitario Los Valles, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico Alondra Camacho-Vázquez, Neuropsychology Laboratory, Centro Universitario Los Valles, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico María G. Ayón-Rubio, Neuropsychology Laboratory, Centro Universitario Los Valles, Universidad de Guadalajara, Ameca, Jalisco, Mexico


Background: When we experience an emotion, a personal evaluation of stimuli and physiological responses occurs, based on the previous exposure. Anger can be triggered when we feel upset by movies, and those more realistic as videos of the internet can be even more arousing. Measures can be obtained to estimate synchronous participation between two brain areas during the processing of emotions. Objective: We compare brain activity in response to fictional visual stimuli taken from a movie bank versus real internet videos. Methods: We recorded subjective responses, and electrophysiological parameters to compare the functional connectivity patterns of 26 young women divided into two groups. Results: Results showed differences of functional connectivity revealed a characteristic pattern associated with each type of video observed, with an increased electroencephalographic (EEG) correlation during observation of the internet videos and a decreased EEG correlation while watching the movie clips, between frontal and temporal regions in slow and fast bands. Conclusion: Functional connectivity EEG analysis, together with the subjetive physiological assessment, allow for a closer approach to the study of the cognitive processing of emotions.



Keywords: Functional connectivity. Emotions. Anger. Psychophysiology.